Home Latest How many of Lowton & Golborne’s listed buildings do you recognise?
Grade 2 Listed buildings in Lowton and Golborne

How many of Lowton & Golborne’s listed buildings do you recognise?

by gemmamelling

Keen photographer, Stan Crook, has been out and about recently, capturing fantastic pictures of some of the most historically important buildings in our two towns – and the resulting images are stunning.

Stan, who has a keen interest in local history, is a retired engineer and a keen traveller, having recently trekked solo across Peru. Before he heads out on his next adventure – seeing the Valley of the Kings – we asked him to capture his more local travels for us on Lowton & Golborne News.

We’re sure most people will recognise some of these old buildings, which are all Grade 2 Listed, but can you name them all?

Here’s Stan’s guided tour of Lowton and Golborne’s heritage…

By Stan Crook

Stan Crook on a climb up Mount Snowdon

Stan Crook on a climb up Mount Snowdon

 

There are a number of Grade 2 Listed Buildings in Lowton and Golborne – see how many you can recognise from my photos.

And if you have any memories or facts about any of the buildings I’ve included here, please let me know in the comments below.

Here we go…

No 1 – A farmhouse, dating back to the 16th century

Lightshaw Hall off Wigan Road, Golborne. A farmhouse dating back to the 16th Century.

Copyright: Stan Crook

This timber-framed farmhouse was largely rebuilt in brick in the 18th and 19th centuries. It has a stone-slate roof, two storeys, three bays, and a lower two-storey wing.

Most of the windows are casements, some are mullioned, and in the right is a horizontally-sliding sash window.

Did you guess it? 

It is Lightshaw Hall, Off Wigan Road Golborne.

No 2: A ‘timely’ reminder of days gone by…

Sundial at St Luke's Church, Lowton

Copyright: Stan Crook

Did you know that this ornamental carved stone is actually a sundial, dating back to the 18th century?

It consists of a vase-type baluster shaft with a scalloped base, and has a decorative collar including an egg and dart band. The dial and Gnomon are sadly missing.

Do you know where this sundial is? 

Yes, you’ll find it at the entrance to the churchyard of St Luke’s Church, Lowton.

No.3 – Has been around since 1740

Grade 2 Listed Farmhouse, Orford Close, Golborne

Copyright: Stan Crook

A brick farmhouse dating back to 1740, this building has rendered sides, a slate roof, two storeys and three bays. The doorway has a semicircular arch and a recessed brick panel. The windows are casements with cambered brick arches on the ground floor and segmental arches in the upper floor.

Do you know where this Farmhouse is?

It is on Orford Close, Golborne.

No. 4: A well known landmark

Byrom Hall, Lowton

Copyright Stan Crook

Most of us will recognise this one. It is, of course, Byrom Hall, off Slag Lane, Lowton.

A rendered brick house with bands, a Modillion eaves cornice and a slate roof. There are three storeys, a double-depth plan, and three bays. The central doorway has a fanlight and a canopy on enriched brackets. The windows are replacement 20th-century casements with stone sills and keystones.

But do you know what year Byrom Hall was built? 

It dates all the way back to 1713.

No. 5 –  A 17th century farmhouse

Fairhouse Farm

Copyright: Stan Crook

This farmhouse is timber framed and rendered, with repairs and extensions in brick, and a slate roof. There are two storeys and five bays, the first bay projecting as a gabled cross-wing. At the rear is a later continuous outshut. The windows are 20th-century replacement casements. Inside is a pair of back-to-back inglenooks and bressumers.

Can you guess where this is?

It’s Fairhouse Farm, on Pocket Nook Lane, Lowton.

No 6: Brick farmhouse from 18th century

Ashton Road Farmhouse, Golborne

Copyright: Stan Crook

A brick farmhouse, rendered on the sides and rear, with a stone-slate roof, this 18th century building has two storeys, two bays, a one-bay extension to the left, and rear extensions. The central doorway has a flat hood with a datestone above. The windows are casements with stone sills and segmental brick heads.

Do you know where this farmhouse can be found?

It is on Ashton Road, Golborne.

No 7: A beautiful barn conversion

Grade 2 Listed barn conversion on Orford Close, Golborne

Copyright: Stan Crook

This beautifully converted barn is now an attractive home, but in 1846 it was an important part of a working farm.

Have you guessed where it is?

This barn can be found on Orford Close, Golborne – once part of Town Farm.

No 8: A house that has changed with the centuries

37 Barn Lane, Golborne, a Grade 2 Listed Property

Copyright: Stan Crook

This house dates back originally to the late 17th century. It inorporates earlier material and it was extended and altered in the 19th century. The house consists of a hall and a west wing, with a rear service wing added in the 19th century. The west wing is timber framed, and was clad in brick in the late 17th century. In the front facing the road are horizontally-sliding sash windows, and the other windows are casements.

Did you guess it? 

It is number 37, Barn Lane, Golborne.

No 9: A farmhouse with a new lease of life

Grade 2 Listed Lawsons Farmhouse, Orford Close, Golborne

Copyright: Stan Crook

This brick farmhouse dates back to the 17th centuy and incudes a plinth on the right return and a slate roof.

There are two storeys, a double-depth plan, and a front of two gabled bays. The doorway has a segmental head, the windows on the front are casements with segmental brick arches, and in the left return are horizontally-sliding sash windows. Inside there is an inglenook and a bressumer, and attached to the front of the house is a wall with round coping stones there is also a mural inside which is part of the listing.

Did you guess where this is? 

It is Lawsons Farmhouse, on Orford Close, Golborne.

No 10: A place of worship for 172 years

St Thomas's Church, Golborne, a Grade 2 Listed building

Copyright: Stan Crook

This will be a familiar sight to many people in Lowton and Golborne. This church, designed by Joseph Clarke and built in stages, is in stone with a clay tile roof. It dates back to 1848 and consists of a nave, a south aisle, a south porch, a chancel with a north chapel and vestries, and a west tower. The tower has diagonal buttresses, a three-light west window, gabled clock faces, and a pyramidal roof.

Yes, of course it is:

St Thomas’s Church, Golborne.

No 11: A glimpse at crime and punishment, 1700s style

The stocks on the crossroads in Lowton, which date back to 1766 and are Grade 2 Listed

Copyright: Stan Crook

These will be a familiar sight to many of us, and we maybe pass by on a daily basis with little thought to the history of this Grade 2 Listed item.

So, where are they?

Yes, you guessed it – these are the stocks at St Luke’s church Lowton. They date back to 1766 and consist of two stone posts, tapering towards the top, with Gothic type moulding. They are grooved and hold timber foot restraints.

At the time these stocks were in use, the Hare & Hounds Pub, on the crossroads in Lowton, was used as a Court House. If found guilty of a crime warranting such a punishment, the offender could be taken across the road immediately, and fastened into the stocks – no doubt in front of a baying crowd of onlookers.

No 12: A house of God for many generations

St Luke's Church, Lowton

Copyright: Stan Crook

Ok, no prizes for guessing this one.

But, do you know how old St Luke’s Church in Lowton is?

St Luke’s Church dates back to 1732. The oldest part of the church is the nave, whilst the transepts date from 1771. Alterations were made in 1813, and the chancel probably dates from 1856, the tower from 1862, and a vestry was added in the 20th century.

The church is in brick with rusticated quoins, and consists of a nave, north and south transepts, a chancel, and a west tower. The tower has four stages, and contains a round-headed doorway and windows, diagonal buttresses, a clock face, and an embattled parapet. The nave and transepts have round-headed windows with keystones and impost blocks, the south transept has lunette windows, and in the chancel are simple Venetian windows.

No 13 – The last of the Listed Buildings – an elusive one!

Unfortunately I wasn’t able to get a photo of the 13th Grade 2 Listed building in Lowton and Golborne, but I’ll tell you a little about it.

Holly House, on Newton Road, Lowton dates back to 1830. It is a brick house with a pyramidal Welsh slate roof, a double-depth plan, two storeys, and a symmetrical front of three bays.

There is a central doorway with engaged Doric columns and a fanlight. The windows on the front are sashes, and at the rear is a round-headed stair window and casement windows.

Have you enjoyed this tour of Lowton and Golborne’s Grade 2 Listed buildings and monuments?

Please leave a comment for Stan below. If you have any facts, memories or information to contribute, we’d love to hear it!

 

Would you like to write for Lowton and Golborne News?

A big thank you to Stan Crook for taking the time to share his research and incredible photos with us. If you’d like to see more of Stan’s work, you can follow him on Instagram.

We’d love to have more contributions like this one from Stan. So, if you are passionate about anything local – whether it be history, nature, photography or anything else – and would like to write an article for us… we’d love to hear from you. Get in touch by emailing news@lowtonandgolbornenews.co.uk.

1 comment

Veronica Vancalsteren July 10, 2020 - 11:52 pm

Thanks to all involved in this web site it is very interesting .

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